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Sick Pet? These Are the Best Virtual Vet Services

Sick Pet? These Are the Best Virtual Vet Services

Virtuwoof, like TeleVet, connects you to your current vet. If yours isn’t in the network yet, you can use the Ask Virtuwoof option for advice and recommendations, without prescriptions or diagnosis as there isn’t a valid VCPR. The process is just as easy as TeleVet. You make profiles for each of your pets, adding information like age and breed. When you need to talk to your vet, click “Start a New Visit” on their profile and select a reason from a drop-down menu of 11 common options, including “other” for anything not mentioned. 

You can see exactly how much the vet charges for new issues, follow-ups, and general inquiries. Virtuwoof says its average response time is between 5 and 10 minutes. I also like that the company donates a portion of every visit fee to groups helping animals, as well as to veterinary suicide prevention organizations. 

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Photograph: PetDesk

Best for: People with vets in-network, for organizing your pet’s medical information
Available on: iOS, Android
Cost: Varies by practice; app organization features are free

PetDesk is a telemedicine app with a perk. Not only does it connect you to your pet’s vet via video chat, but it also offers an easy way to keep track of your pet’s medications, appointments, and other needs.

All of your pet’s information is in one spot, including name and contact information for vets, preferred emergency animal hospitals, and groomers. From the homepage, you can see what’s open, make calls, visit respective websites, and in some cases, request an appointment directly in the app or start a video call.

Once you create a pet profile, you can save health records and prescriptions. In the To-Do tab, you can create reminders for giving your pet medication, restocking food and supplies, and scheduling checkups, or ask for notifications on their birthday. While you will need to have a vet in-network to make virtual appointments, you can use the service as a free medical dashboard for your pet’s records.

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Photograph: Airvet

Best for: Emergencies—when you need answers to general questions instantly
Available on: iOS, Android
Cost: $20 or $36 a month options available

The Best RSS Feed Readers (Because the Internet Is a Mess)

The Best RSS Feed Readers (Because the Internet Is a Mess)

The automation does require a pro account. Pro accounts also get some other nice features, like the ability to integrate with IFTTT and Zapier, an offline mode for the mobile apps. It also includes my personal favorite: keeping your YouTube account in sync with your RSS reading. You can watch YouTube videos in Inoreader, and next time you log into YouTube, you won’t have a ton of unwatched videos.

Inoreader offers a free (with ads) account, which is good for testing out the service to see if it meets your needs. If it does, the Pro account is $7 a month (it’s cheaper if you buy a year up front), which brings more advanced features and support for more feeds.

Best for Beginners

Feedly RSS reader
Photograph: Feedly

Feedly is probably the most popular RSS reader on the web, and for good reason. It’s well-designed, easy to use, and offers great search options so it’s easy to add all your favorite sites. It lacks one thing that makes Inoreader slightly better in my view—the YouTube syncing—but otherwise Feedly is an excellent choice. 

It even has a few features Inoreader does not, like Evernote integration (you can save articles to Evernote) and a notes feature for jotting down your own thoughts on stories. Feedly also touts Leo, the company’s AI search assistant, which can help filter your feeds and surface the content you really want. In my testing, I found that it worked well enough, but a big part of what I like about RSS is that there’s is no AI—I don’t want automated filtering. Depending on how you use RSS, though, this could be a useful feature.

Like the others here, Feedly offers iOS and Android apps along with a web interface. Feedly is free up to 100 feeds. A Pro subscription is $8 a month (it’s cheaper if you pay for a year) and enables more features like notes, save to Evernote, and ad-free reading. The Pro+ account gets you the AI-features and more for $12 a month.

Best For DIYers

Newsblur RSS reader
Photograph: Newsblur

Newsblur is a refreshingly simple old-school RSS reader. You won’t find AI or YouTube syncing here—it’s for reading RSS feeds and getting on with your life. It can subscribe to all kinds of content (including newsletters), read full stories (even from RSS feeds that don’t offer them), integrate with IFTTT, and even track story changes if a publisher updates an article.