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The Best Reusable Water Bottles To Ditch Single-Use Plastics

The Best Reusable Water Bottles To Ditch Single-Use Plastics

It’s not hard to make a decent insulated water bottle. Rarely do I find one that can’t keep a cold drink cold or a hot drink hot, and very few fail spectacularly at keeping liquid inside them. What sets reusable water bottles apart these days are their forms and features: better lids, tougher finishes, and small design flourishes. Some are just nicer to use, easier to sip from, and more ergonomic to hold. Others will fare better on the trail, dangling from a pack.

No matter where or when you’re using one, a reusable bottle is a good idea to cut single-use plastics out of your life. The same goes for non-insulated water bottles, whose main function is not to leak. I tested a variety of reusable bottles from numerous brands. Below are the ones I liked (and a few I didn’t).

On the go? Be sure to check out our other buying guides, like the Best Face Masks and Best Travel Mugs.

Updated October 2021: We adjusted stock and pricing, and we also added a pick to our honorable mentions.

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Google’s Much-Hyped Pixel 6 Undercuts Its Peers at Just $599

Google’s Much-Hyped Pixel 6 Undercuts Its Peers at Just $599

I’ve been using the two for the past few days and can’t share much about them just yet—look for our review next week—but these Pixels feel just as high-end as most $1,000 phones. The Pro especially has shiny aluminum around the edges that give it a classy look, whereas the Pixel 6 sticks with a matte texture that’s more subdued. Both are wrapped in glass, with Gorilla Glass Victus protecting the Pro’s screen, and Gorilla Glass 6 protecting the standard Pixel 6. Victus is a year or so newer than 6, and supposedly more protective.

These are also two of the larger Pixels Google has produced. The Pixel 6 has a 6.4-inch screen and the Pro is a 6.7 incher, but they don’t feel drastically different in size. That’s because the Pixel 6 has thicker borders around the screen, and the Pro’s screen curves out to the edges to maximize screen space. 

Maxed Out Specs

They have pretty much any feature you’d want in a top-end Android phone, including OLED panels, stereo speakers, full 5G connectivity, speedy Wi-Fi 6E, IP68 water resistance, and wireless charging (a new Pixel Stand wireless charger is on the way too). Both also have fingerprint sensors baked into the display, a first for Google but a feature that’s become the norm on most high-end Android phones.

Like its competitors, the Pixel 6 range does not include charging adapters in the box, just a USB-C to USB-C cable and a USB-C to USB-A adapter. 

Google Pixel 6

Pixel 6 Pro

Photograph: Google

Here’s how they differ:

Pixel 6: There’s a 90-Hz screen refresh rate, just like on last year’s Pixel 5, and a 1,080 x 2,400-pixel resolution. The Tensor chip, which Google says delivers up to 80 percent faster performance over its Qualcomm-powered predecessor, is joined with 8 gigabytes of RAM. It has a 4,524-mAh battery cell, which Google says should last more than a day. Neither has a MicroSD card slot (nor a headphone jack), but on the Pixel 6, you can choose between 128 or 256 gigabyte storage options. 

Pixel 6 Pro: You get a higher 1,440 x 3,120-pixel resolution and a 120-Hz screen refresh rate, which Google says can dip as low as 10-Hz when there’s not much happening on the screen to save battery life. The bigger size means a bigger 4,905-mAh capacity, and you also get 12 gigabytes of RAM. And if you record a lot of video, there’s an additional 512 gigabyte storage option. The Pro has an exclusive ultra wideband (UWB) chip, which can help it pinpoint the location of other UWB devices, similar to how the new iPhone 13 can find the precise location of Apple AirTags. Google says it will roll out “several features” that utilize UWB in the coming months but we don’t yet know what those will be.

Camera Upgrade

Google Pixel 6

Pixel 6

Photograph: Google

Pixel phones are known for their stellar cameras, but their lead has waned. To combat this, Google is upgrading its imaging hardware. Both the Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro have the same main camera, a 50-megapixel large 1/1.31-inch sensor that can take in up to 150 percent more light than the Pixel 5. The camera uses a process called pixel binning, where pixels merge to absorb more light, so you end up with a 12.5-megapixel photo. 

Apple Finally Remembered What Makes Laptops Great

Apple Finally Remembered What Makes Laptops Great

The reintroduction of a MagSafe magnetic charging port, a staple in older Macs, is especially welcome if you tend to be clumsy and trip over your charging cables. MagSafe mostly ensures the cable releases and that the laptop doesn’t go crashing to the floor.

That reversion to functionality has come with some sacrifice. The new MacBook Pros are heavier than the previous generation of MacBook Pro, weighing 4.7 pounds and 3.5 pounds, respectively, adding about a half pound of heft to the previous generation. But they’re also just a hair thicker, which means Apple has done some clever maneuvering of the machines’ internals to make these ports fit. Battery life, in some ways the only spec that matters, is supposed to be substantially better as well.

That’s due in no small part to the chip upgrade these laptops are getting. The new M1 Pro and M1 Max chips build on last year’s M1 chip, which was Apple’s first custom-designed processor for Macs and powered last year’s MacBook Air and 13-inch MacBook Pro. These new chips should offer massive gains in performance—though benchmark and speed tests will soon reveal just how big these boosts are—and in a series of not-so-subtle charts, Apple showed how the chips should outperform Intel-powered machines in almost every category. The company claims that the M1 Max’s 32-core GPU, for example, rivals even the most powerful laptops with discrete graphics processors.

Apple’s own apps have been optimized for the new chips, which will start rolling out when the new MacBook Pros ship at the end of the month, and some third-party developers were on hand (via pretaped videos) to vouch for the newfound power of the Macs. But these new MacBook Pros will still use last year’s emulator to run some x86 apps. Arguably, it’s some of these apps that are the most important element of MacBook Pros: Buyers of Apple’s high-end hardware also tend to be the customers who will spend a lot of money on software, whether for their jobs or more casual use cases, and this is exactly who Apple is targeting with these $2,000-and-up machines.

“A lot of creative professionals have been anxious to see how the M1 was going to be developed for their needs,” says Mikako Kitagawa, research director at Gartner. “It’s not like all the apps they need are [optimized], but Apple has been working with key third-party developers like Adobe, so between the performance boost and key applications this could be the time for creative professionals to replace their devices.”

Kitagawa said she believes these new MacBook Pros won’t be high-volume items, considering their starting price of $2,000. Putting it another way: She doesn’t think that sales of the new MacBook Pros will alter Apple’s current market share in global PC shipments.

But the new machines are still technologically—and symbolically—significant for Apple. She noted that Microsoft recently announced a new Surface Studio laptop, which is also aimed at designers, developers, and producers. That’s another laptop that’s unlikely to make a huge dent in the market, but it’s a chance for Microsoft to show off what it thinks it can offer creative consumers. Appealing to creatives, and to some extent, counterculture, has been in Apple’s computer DNA. In recent years, it lost its way. To build MacBook Pros for the future, Apple rightly followed the path back to that past.


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The 10 Best TVs We’ve Tested (and Helpful Buying Tips)

The 10 Best TVs We’ve Tested (and Helpful Buying Tips)

Saving up for a new screen? To help you navigate the dozens of seemingly identical TV models from Samsung, LG, Vizio, TCL, Sony, and other manufacturers, we’ve watched hundreds of hours of content on them and picked a few of our favorites. We’ve listed everything from the best budget TV to the absolute best set you can buy—and a few excellent choices in between.

Unless labeled otherwise, every TV we link to is 55 inches. There are often larger and smaller sizes available on the retailer’s site, but this is a very good size for most living rooms. All of these models have a 4K Ultra HD pixel resolution (and some have 8K), because there aren’t a lot of good reasons to buy a standard HDTV anymore.

We also believe you should invest in a good soundbar and TV streaming stick. TVs now come with wonderful displays, but they’re terrible at sound and running apps. Be sure to check out our many other buying guides.

Updated October 2021: We’ve added the Samsung QN90A, Hisense U8G, LG C1 OLED, and Sony A90J. There have been mild price fluctuations due to the international chip shortage. We’ve updated the links and prices, but they may fluctuate more than usual.

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It’s Play Time: Video Games and Peripherals Are on Sale

It’s Play Time: Video Games and Peripherals Are on Sale

Holiday shipping timelines will be tighter than ever this year. WIRED will be all over the Black Friday and Cyber Monday madness, but we’re also keeping our eyes peeled for early-bird discounts on tried-and-true gear, to ensure that your loved ones receive their gifts on time. This week, we found plenty of price drops on video games and gaming accessories. 

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If you buy something using links in our stories, we may earn a commission. This helps support our journalism. Learn more.

Gaming Peripheral Deals

black headset with mic

Logitech G Pro X

Photograph: Logitech

This is the lowest price ever on one of our favorite corded gaming headsets. It doesn’t look like it’s made for gamers, which might be a good thing, but it works with every console and PC. The soundstage is expansive, and the microphone was engineered with the help of Blue (the makers of the popular Blue Yeti USB mics). 

This mouse got shuffled off our list of the Best Gaming Mice, but it’s still a solid pick. It’s very responsive, and the wireless design means there’s no cord to get in your way. There are also several buttons around it so you can create custom shortcuts and macros, plus Razer’s iconic RGB lighting makes the whole package aesthetically pleasing. This is one of the best discounts we’ve tracked, coming in at just $10 more than the lowest we’ve seen for the mouse. You can also snag the standard Razer Basilisk X Hyperspeed for $35 ($25 off)—it might be a better deal if you don’t care about tons of onboard buttons or the absolute lowest latency.

The Apex Pro lets you adjust the mechanical switches on each key, enabling faster response times and a more customized typing experience. It has tons of customizable color options as well, and there’s a tiny OLED display that shows system alerts, volume, and other settings you can tweak in SteelSeries’ software. This is just $5 more than the lowest price we’ve ever tracked. 

The Razer Blade 15 is one of our favorite gaming laptops, and this edition gets you a few more bells and whistles packed into the same form factor. It features a 10th-gen Intel Core i7 processor, 512 GB of solid-state storage, 16 GB of RAM, and an NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 GPU. We’ve seen slightly better deals on this model, but this is still one of its lowest prices over the past several months. 

This lightning-fast NVMe drive is great for nearly any gaming PC. It has super-fast read and write speeds, so you can expect speedy load times in your games. A few of us on the WIRED Gear team have been impressed by this drive (it’ll be added to our How to Build a PC guide soon!). For more storage, the 2-TB model is also discounted. Both are down to the lowest prices we’ve seen.

Video Game Deals

The Legend of Zelda Breath of the Wild
Photograph: Amazon

This deal is $2 more than one of the lowest prices we’ve seen for this game. It’s for a physical copy. Breath of the Wild isn’t the newest title, but it’s easily one of the Best Nintendo Switch Games around—it’s especially a must-try on the new Switch OLED. 

This includes Final Fantasy Adventure, Secret of Mana, and Trials of Mana in one package. It’s a good gift for anyone with a fondness for the SNES console or these titles, but really, everyone should play these games at least once. The deal matches a low price we’ve seen a few other times.

This game has dipped to this price before, but it’s still a good deal. Kingdom Hearts III has great reviews across the net. Maybe you feel inspired after the recent announcement that Sora will be the final character in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate, or maybe you’re staring down winter hibernation with limited entertainment options. Either way, this is a great way to kill some time. 

Street style meets storytelling in this recent release set in Shibuya, Tokyo. Your object is to solve a game within a game by exploring your environment and conquering negative emotions. Sounds like a good time to us.

Building your own PC is basically the opposite of free, but right now this simulator doesn’t cost a dime. It’s a great tool for figuring out your rig configuration ahead of actually assembling it. It uses real-world components to teach you how to build a desktop and troubleshoot potential hurdles. Pair it with PC Part Picker and our guide on How to Build a Desktop PC and you should feel prepared in no time.

For those unfamiliar, Humble Bundle offers a “pay what you want” structure featuring different curated game bundles. Part of the proceeds go to charity. This week’s bundle helps support the Breast Cancer Research Foundation and features a few different PC games that coincide with their board game counterparts. Chip in a few more bucks to get even more game downloads (like Carcassonne in the $9 bundle).

The unique gameplay mechanics and creepy setting make this one of the best games of 2019, but it still is an excellent title to try if you’ve never had the chance. The story has a surprising amount of depth, and did I say you get Jedi-like telekinesis powers? 


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